Skip to content ↓
Newton Burgoland Primary School

Newton Burgoland Primary School

Together We Can Achieve Excellence

Computing

Together We Make Learning A Memorable, Unmissable Adventure

A high-quality computing education equips pupils to use computational thinking and creativity to understand and change the world. Computing has deep links with mathematics, science, and design and technology, and provides insights into both natural and artificial systems. The core of computing is computer science, in which pupils are taught the principles of information and computation, how digital systems work, and how to put this knowledge to use through programming. Building on this knowledge and understanding, pupils are equipped to use information technology to create programs, systems and a range of content. Computing also ensures that pupils become digitally literate – able to use, and express themselves and develop their ideas through, information and communication technology – at a level suitable for the future workplace and as active participants in a digital world.

Intent

 

We want all learners to reach at least the expected National Curriculum standard by the end of year 6 and to be keen to continue their studies in key stage 3 and beyond. We want learners to be e-safe and e-confident.

The computing lesson should be one our learners look forward to and greet with enthusiasm. They should leave lessons wanting to find out more and knowing how to do so safely.

When studying computing, learners will draw on their developing learning habits, making progress in their ability to persevere, work effectively as a team, respect and celebrate difference, ask questions and create. We want learners to be responsible and kind users of technology.

We want learners to build their skills progressively from EYFS to year 6 and beyond and give teachers the confidence to support learners on that journey.

In line with the National Curriculum we have 4 broad aims for learners to:

  • Understand and apply the fundamental principles and concepts of computer science, including abstraction, logic, algorithms and data representation
  •  Analyse problems in computational terms, and have repeated practical experience of writing computer programs in order to solve such problems
  •  Evaluate and apply information technology, including new or unfamiliar technologies, analytically to solve problems
  • Be responsible, competent, confident and creative users of information and communication technology.

 

.

Implementation

Our learners are digital natives. They have never lived in a world without computers and cell phones. They have grown up with social media and the Internet; they cannot imagine a less-connected, less-instant world. We recognise their and our vulnerability to digital persuasion and digital deception alongside the ability to find an instant answer.

We want learners to be prepared for their future in a rapidly changing digital world, to understand the value and risks of the Internet so that they are e-confident and e-safe. We want them to be knowledgeable, responsible creators and consumers of digital content.

Approximately 30 hours annually is allocated to computing- some of this time is cross-curricular.

The school has adopted the 'teach computing Scheme' from January 2022 which is supplemented with resources from discovery education and supported by the e-safety element of the PSHCE curriculum.

Learners support and lead the development of e-safety through the ‘Internet Legends’ programme. Year 5 and 6 pupils visit the e-safety zone within warning zone.

The choice of scheme supports teacher subject knowledge and pupil progression it allows all learners  to have the opportunity to revisit and refine knowledge, skills and techniques

Assessment, Recording and Reporting

In all subjects there are three broad areas for assessment:

  • Children’s knowledge and understanding
  • How well children can use and apply their knowledge, understanding and skills at the end of a unit of work to complete an independent (of an adult) task or challenge.
  • How well learners are developing habits for learning and character

Teachers assess learner’s work, their attitudes, increasing skills, knowledge and understanding, by making informal judgements as they observe them during lessons. This assessment enables planning to be tailored to meet learners needs. Assessment encompasses teacher, peer and self-assessment. In all subjects, opportunities for both Assessment for Learning and Assessment of Learning are built into provision. Learners are supported to reflect on their own learning and, age appropriately, to make judgements about their strengths and needs, beginning to plan how to make progress and set personal targets.

Baseline assessment, in order to understand pupils’ prior learning, is an essential part of planning to ensure new learning is relevant and progress can be assessed.

The learners work, in particular baseline assessments and end of unit assessments, which are recorded within learners’ workbooks are used to make decisions at the end of each unit, and at the end of each year, as to next learning steps and whether or not learners are making strong progress and are on track for end of key stage expectation.

Progress is recorded and reported to parents as part of the child’s annual school report

Special Education Needs

Computing is taught to all children, whatever their ability, in accordance with the school curriculum policy of providing a broad and balanced education to all children. Teachers provide learning opportunities matched to the needs of children with learning difficulties. We recognise particular needs where pupils are vulnerable to ensure that they are supported to understand the dangers of the Internet.

In 2021/22 to support 'catch-up' in all curriculum areas units of work have been condensed and completed out of order, in response to assessment information so that all pupils are on track for the start of 22/23.

 

Impact

Prior to the pandemic:

  • Pupils made good progress in computing to achieve at least ARE by the end of year 6.
  • Pupils were creative with computing
  • Pupils understood the importance of being e-safe.
  • Pupils contributed to the schools e-safety work.
  • The school achieved the local e-safety award.

the National Curriculum

The national curriculum for computing aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • Can understand and apply the fundamental principles and concepts of computer science, including abstraction, logic, algorithms and data representation
  • Can analyse problems in computational terms, and have repeated practical experience of writing computer programs in order to solve such problems
  • Can evaluate and apply information technology, including new or unfamiliar technologies, analytically to solve problems
  • Are responsible, competent, confident and creative users of information and communication technology.

You have not allowed cookies and this content may contain cookies.

If you would like to view this content please

 

early Years Foundation stage

Although technology is not part of the revised EYFS it is a part of our everyday lives. Computing in EYFS covers threes aspects:

  • What is a Computer?
  • We Control Technology
  • Tinkering: Bee-Bots

This prepares our learners for the National Curriculum in key stage 1.

Computing systems and networks

Foundation Stage:

What is computer?

  • Explore technology.
  • Use different digital devices.
  •  Recognise that you can access content on a digital device.
  •  Use a mouse, touchscreen or appropriate access device to target and select options on screen.
  • Recognise a selection of digital devices.
  • Recognise the basic parts of a computer, e.g. mouse, screen, keyboard.
  •  Select a digital device to fulfil a specific task, e.g. to take a photo.

Year 1

Technology around us Recognising technology in school and using it responsibly building on learning in foundation stage.

year 2

Information technology around us Identifying IT and how its responsible use improves our world in school and beyond.

year 3/4 - Connecting computers

Identifying that digital devices have inputs, processes, and outputs, and how devices can be connected to make networks

Year 3/4 - The Internet:

Recognising the Internet as a network of networks including the WWW, and why we should evaluate online content.

year 5/6- Sharing information

Identifying and exploring how information is shared between digital systems

year 5/6 - Internet communication

Recognising how the WWW can be used to communicate and be searched to find information.

In 2021/22 these KS 2 units have been shortened to allow 'catch-up.

Creating media

Foundation stage

  • Select a digital device to fulfil a specific task, e.g. to take a photo.
  • Create simple digital content, e.g. record audio.
  • Create simple digital content, e.g. digital art.

Year 1

Digital painting Choosing appropriate tools in a program to create art, and making comparisons with working non-digitally.

Digital writing Using a computer to create and format text, before comparing to writing non-digitally

Year 2

Digital photography Capturing and changing digital photographs for different purposes

Making music Using a computer as a tool to explore rhythms and melodies, before creating a musical composition.

Year 3/4

Stop-frame animation Capturing and editing digital still images to produce a stop-frame animation that tells a story

Audio editing Capturing and editing audio to produce a podcast, ensuring that copyright is considered.

Desktop publishing Creating documents by modifying text, images, and page layouts for a specified purpose

Photo editing Manipulating digital images, and reflecting on the impact of changes and whether the required purpose is fulfilled.

Year 5/6

Video editing: Planning, capturing, and editing video to produce a short film

Webpage creation Designing and creating webpages, giving consideration to copyright, aesthetics, and navigation.

Vector drawing Creating images in a drawing program by using layers and groups of objects.

3D modelling Planning, developing, and evaluating 3D computer models of physical objects.

In 2021/22 these KS 2 units have been shortened to allow 'catch-up. year5 and 6 have accessed Year 3/4 content.

Data and information

Foundation Stage

  • Answer basic questions about information displayed in images e.g. more or less

  • Use technology to explore and access digital content.

Year 1

Grouping data Exploring object labels, then using them to sort and group objects by properties.

Year 2

Pictograms Collecting data in tally charts and using attributes to organise and present data on a computer.

Year 3/4

Branching databases Building and using branching databases to group objects using yes/no question

Data logging Recognising how and why data is collected over time, before using data loggers to carry out an investigation.

Year 5/6

Flat-file databases Using a database to order data and create charts to answer questions

Introduction to spreadsheets Answering questions by using spreadsheets to organise and calculate data.

programming

Foundation Stage

  • Explore technology.
  • Use different digital devices.
  • Repeat an action with technology to trigger a specific outcome.
  • Recognise the success or failure of an action.
  • Follow simple instructions to control a digital device.
  • Recognise that we control computers.

Year 1

Moving a robot Writing short algorithms and programs for floor robots, and predicting program outcomes

Programming animations Designing and programming the movement of a character on screen to tell stories

Year 2

Robot algorithms Creating and debugging programs, and using logical reasoning to make predictions.

Programming quizzes Designing algorithms and programs that use events to trigger sequences of code to make an interactive quiz.

In order that pupils in KS2 are able to build skills and knowledge progressively in programming, all programming units are taught in Year B. In 2021/22 some aspects of programming have been prioritised so that pupils are ready for year B in 2022/23:

  • What is block coding?
  • Creating a basic program using scratch and python
  • Debugging

Year 3/4

Sequencing sounds Creating sequences in a block-based programming language to make music

Events and actions in programs Writing algorithms and programs that use a range of events to trigger sequences

Audio editing Capturing and editing audio to produce a podcast, ensuring that copyright is considered.

Repetition in games Using a block-based programming language to explore count-controlled and infinite loops when creating a game.

Year 5/6

Repetition in games Using a block-based programming language to explore count-controlled and infinite loops when creating a game.

Selection in quizzes Exploring selection in programming to design and code an interactive quiz.

Variables in games Exploring variables when designing and coding a game.

Sensing Designing and coding a project that captures inputs from a physical device.

 

In year 1, pupils explore simple programming with Beebots.

In Year 2, pupils begin to explore very basic and straightforward Algorithms in Scratch.

In Years 3 and 4, pupils develop the complexity of their coding in Scratch and develop their skills their ability to produce algorithms with a range of outputs. 

 

 

 

Recording progress in computing Year 1

Recording progress in computing Year 2

Recording progress in computing Year 3/4

Recording progress in computing Year 5/6