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Newton Burgoland Primary School

Newton Burgoland Primary School

Together We Can Achieve Excellence

Geography

 Together We Make Learning A Memorable, Unmissable Adventure

A high-quality geography education should inspire in pupils a curiosity and fascination about the world and its people that will remain with them for the rest of their lives. Teaching should equip pupils with knowledge about diverse places, people, resources and natural and human environments, together with a deep understanding of the Earth’s key physical and human processes. As pupils progress, their growing knowledge about the world should help them to deepen their understanding of the interaction between physical and human processes, and of the formation and use of landscapes and environments. Geographical knowledge, understanding and skills provide the frameworks and approaches that explain how the Earth’s features at different scales are shaped, interconnected and change over time.

Approximately 30 hours is allocated to geography annually in key stage 2. (15 in key stage 1 so that basic skills development including reading and PSHCE can be prioritised)

Intent

We want all learners to reach at least the expected National Curriculum standard by the end of year 6 and to be keen to continue their studies in key stage 3 and beyond. We want learners to be able to see themselves as geographers.

The geography lesson should be one our learners look forward to and greet with enthusiasm. They should leave lessons wanting to find out more.

When studying geography, learners will draw on their developing learning habits, making progress in their ability to persevere, work effectively as a team, respect and celebrate difference, ask questions and create. We want learners to be interested in the world they are growing up in, aware of the importance of stewardship and of global and local issues. We aim to give pupils a broad range of knowledge about their world, combined with curiosity and the skills to be able to find out more.

Our curriculum ensures that pupils can explore 7 key concepts from EYFS to year 6 building knowledge and understanding of: space, place, environment, Interconnection, scale, sustainability and change

Implementation

Where possible links are made between study in other subject areas and geography.  We draw on learners’ own experiences and interests.  In key stage 2 pupils work together throughout the year to explore: ‘Fridays for the Future’

Our curriculum moves from the local area, to the United Kingdom and beyond, using picture books and stories in key stage one to explore places we may never visit, and the lives of others. We take advantage of trips and visits in other curriculum areas asking:

•             What is this place like?

•             Who lives here?

•             How is this place like other places I have visited? In what ways is it different?

•             Why is this place like this?

The curriculum is organised to enable leaners to revisit and explore, with greater maturity, themes of Locational and place Knowledge; Human and Physical Geography; Geographical Skills and Fieldwork including using maps, atlases and globes.

  • Key vocabulary has been identified, alongside enrichment opportunities including trips and visitors.
  • The reading scheme includes high quality non-fiction to support learning in geography.
  • Themes are revisited, and teaching makes links to what has already been learnt and what will be learnt next.
  • Continuous provision and direct teaching in EYFS is carefully planned to prepare pupils for the national curriculum.
  • A progression document is in place to support the assess, plan, do review cycle
  • Teachers are careful to avoid cognitive overload by planning learning in small steps with time to develop understanding and spaced retrieval to aid long term memory
  • Learners understanding of settlements, connectivity, ability to use maps and atlases and knowledge of human and physical geography are secured by revisiting to develop  a strong foundation for the next phase of education.

Assessment, Recording and Reporting

In all subjects there are three broad areas for assessment:

  • Children’s knowledge and understanding
  • How well children can use and apply their knowledge, understanding and skills at the end of a unit of work to complete an independent (of an adult) task or challenge.
  • How well learners are developing habits for learning and character

Teachers assess learner’s work, their attitudes, increasing skills, knowledge and understanding, by making informal judgements as they observe them during lessons. This assessment enables planning to be tailored to meet learners needs. Assessment encompasses teacher, peer and self-assessment. In all subjects, opportunities for both Assessment for Learning and Assessment of Learning are built into provision. Learners are supported to reflect on their own learning and, age appropriately, to make judgements about their strengths and needs, beginning to plan how to make progress and set personal targets.

 

Baseline assessment, in order to understand pupils’ prior learning, is an essential part of planning to ensure new learning is relevant and progress can be assessed.

The learners work, in particular baseline assessments and end of unit assessments, which are recorded within learners’ workbooks are used to make decisions at the end of each unit, and at the end of each year, as to next learning steps and whether or not learners are making strong progress and are on track for end of key stage expectation.

Progress is recorded and reported to parents as part of the child’s annual school report.

Special Educational Needs

Geography is taught to all children, whatever their ability, in accordance with the school curriculum policy of providing a broad and balanced education to all children. Teachers provide learning opportunities matched to the needs of children with learning difficulties

Impact

Prior to the pandemic:

  • Pupils made good progress in geography to achieve at least ARE by the end of year 6.
  • Continuous provision and direct teaching in EYFS prepared pupils well for the national curriculum.
  • All children used geographical vocabulary accurately and understood the different strands of geography, with a deep understanding of the Earth’s key physical and human processes.
  • Children made relevant links from geography to other curriculum subjects, such as history and science.
  • Children could speak confidently about their learning in geography and were keen to make a difference in the world.  
  • Those working at greater depth were able to make connections between units of study. They went beyond the knowledge studied and asked questions to further their understanding.
  • Previous pupils have been inspired to study an aspect of geography at university.

As a result of the pandemic pupils have:

  • had fewer opportunities to explore concepts and address misconceptions through talking and questioning – not all learning is secure.
  • had a variety of experiences when home learning and accessed set learning differently.
  • had fewer opportunities for collaboration and fieldwork due to restrictions

By following the assess, plan, do, review cycle teachers will identify areas which need more or less focus over the next 2 years and support all pupils to make strong progress from starting points.

The national Curriculum

The national curriculum for geography aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • develop contextual knowledge of the location of globally significant places – both terrestrial and marine – including their defining physical and human characteristics and how these provide a geographical context for understanding the actions of processes
  • understand the processes that give rise to key physical and human geographical features of the world, how these are interdependent and how they bring about spatial variation and change over time
  • are competent in the geographical skills needed to:
    • collect, analyse and communicate with a range of data gathered through experiences of fieldwork that deepen their understanding of geographical processes
    • interpret a range of sources of geographical information, including maps, diagrams, globes, aerial photographs and Geographical Information Systems (GIS)
    • communicate geographical information in a variety of ways, including through maps, numerical and quantitative skills and writing at length.

EYFS

Understanding the world involves guiding children to make sense of their physical world and their community through opportunities to explore, observe and find out about people, places, technology and the environment

People and communities: children talk about past and present events in their own lives and in the lives of family members. They know that other children don’t always enjoy the same things, and are sensitive to this. They know about similarities and differences between themselves and others, and among families, communities and traditions.

The world: children know about similarities and differences in relation to places, objects, materials and living things. They talk about the features of their own immediate environment and how environments might vary from one another. They make observations of animals and plants and explain why some things occur, and talk about changes.

Learning in Geography will support learning in Expressive Arts, Maths, Personal, Social and Emotional Development and communication and Language.

learning in EYFS

Locational knowledge and Place knowledge

  • Notice things in the place where they are and react to them by commenting.
  • Ask questions.
  • Respond to questions – like what and where?
  • Where they live
  • What the school is like

Fieldwork

  • Use some of their senses to observe places
  • Identify simple types of buildings & places around and know their  special features

Use of basic geographical vocabulary

  • Use simple geographical vocabulary e.g. near/far up/down, wet, dry.
  • Describe a place in simple terms e.g. weather, season, beach, farm, hill, town, shop, house.

Using globes, maps & plans.

  • Play games with globes & maps.
  • Draw  simple picture maps,  plans with labels of  known places , or imaginary places/ stories.

Map work skills

  • Follow directions – up, down, left and right
  • That maps help us to locate places and features

Human and physical geography: enquiry skills and communication

  • Tell what a place is like in simple terms

learning In KS1

Locational knowledge and Place knowledge

  • The world’s 7 continents and 5 oceans
  • Name, locate &identify characteristics of the 4 countries & capital cities of the UK & surrounding seas
  • Understand geog. similarities and differences through studying the human & physical geography of a small area of the UK & contrasting non-European country
  • Where they live and where Leicester is on a UK map Fieldwork
  •  Use simple fieldwork and observational skills to study the geography of the school and its grounds.
  • Complete a chart to express opinions during Fieldwork.
  • Use first hand observation to investigate places – the school grounds, the streets around and the local area.
  • Recognise and record different types of land use, buildings and environments

Use of basic geographical vocabulary

  • Understand basic geographical specific vocabulary relating to human and physical geography 
  • Use specific key vocabulary to describe  physical features  
  • Key human features 
  • Use mathematical vocabulary to describe position and location

Using globes, maps & plans.

  • How to find information in a simple atlas
  • Use world maps, atlases and globes to identify UK & its countries
  • Identify the countries, continents and oceans studied.
  • Identify the location of hot and cold areas of the world in relation to the Equator and the North and South Poles.
  • Use aerial photographs and plan perspectives to recognise landmarks and basic human and physical features.

Map work skills

  • Follow a route on prepared maps (left/right) & find information.
  •  Use simple compass directions (NSEW)
  •  Use locational and directional language (e.g. near and far; left and right)  to describe the location of features and routes on a map.
  • Make  a simple map (e.g. from a story). 
  • Use & construct basic symbols in a key

Human and physical geography: enquiry skills and communication

  • The difference between human and natural features
  •  Use observational skills and ask and respond to questions.
  •  Identify seasonal/ daily UK  weather patterns
  •  Study the key human and physical features of the surrounding environment of my school
  •  Begin to explain how/why
  • Find information from aerial photographs.
  •  Use and apply Maths to help me to show learning
  • How humans can change a place

Our playdough UK maps with labelled countries.

learning in KS2

Locational knowledge

  •  Locate the world’s countries, using maps to focus on Europe (including the location of Russia) and North and South America, concentrating on their environmental regions, key physical and human characteristics, countries, and major cities
  •  Name and locate counties and cities of the United Kingdom, geographical regions and their identifying human and physical characteristics, key topographical features (including hills, mountains, coasts and rivers), and land-use patterns; and understand how some of these aspects have changed over time
  • Identify the position and significance of latitude, longitude, Equator, Northern Hemisphere, Southern Hemisphere, the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn, Arctic and Antarctic Circle, the Prime/Greenwich Meridian and time zones (including day and night)

Place knowledge

  • Understand geographical similarities and differences through the study of human and physical geography of a region of the United Kingdom, a region in a European country, and a region within North or South America

Human and physical geography: enquiry skills and communication

  • describe and understand key aspects of:
  • physical geography, including: climate zones, biomes and vegetation belts, rivers, mountains, volcanoes and earthquakes, and the water cycle
  • human geography, including: types of settlement and land use, economic activity including trade links, and the distribution of natural resources including energy, food, minerals and water

Remote Learning gave us an opportunity to explore volcanos creatively and deliciously!

 

Curriculum Links - History and Geography

Pupils explored land use and trade around the river Nile as part of their work on Ancient Egypt. They made links to work in science on desert habitats and the importance of water. When looking later, at other Ancient Civilisations they will again look at the importance of water and food sources and the impact on location. In this way pupils revisit previous work, aiding long term memory.

 

Pupils in Class 4 loved learning about the Amazon Rainforest as part of their topic on South America, with many of them making creative sculptures and models of Amazonian life. Pupils did this with a solid understanding of the Amazonian Biome and how animals in this environment are adapted, building on their habitats learning in Class 3.

 

All abut me - Foundation / Year 1

Houses and homes- my local area

In this unit of work learners talk about their homes, where they live and places they visit. They will explore the local area.

By the end of this unit learners will be able to:

  • Talk about what our local area is like. (school and village)
  • Use a local map to find places
  • Use compass directions to follow simple instructions on the playground
  • Make observations and record them
  • Explain what the like or dislike about the local area
  • Label places on a map of our local area.
  • Show a ‘route’ on a map of our local area.
  • Understand different types of housing in the local area.
  • Name 3 different types of housing.
  • Explain some differences between these types of houses.
  • Design and build a new home for Travelling Ted working co-operatively in a group.
  • Name the types of jobs that people do in our local area.
  • Ask questions to find out what local people do in our area.
  • Work as a small group to interview a member of the school team to find out about their job.
  • Understand ways that we can change the local area.
  • Suggest 2 ways in which where we live could be improved (made better).

Our wonderful world- Foundation / Year 1

The UK and surrounding seas, London

In thus unit of work the children extend their understanding of where thy live to consider the country they live in and then the United Kingdom. They find out about our capital city - London.

By the end of this unit learners will be able to:

  • Explain the differences between a ‘town’ and the ‘countryside’.
  • Name 2 features of a town/city and 2 features of the countryside.
  • D escribe some differences between a town and the countryside using key words.  
  • Begin to explain some of the pros (good) and cons (bad) for living in these places using key words. 
  • Name the countries and seas of the UK
  • Locate the UK using a map.
  • Explain that the UK is an island. 
  • identify key features of the countries of the UK.
  • Research 4-5 facts/points about one of the countries of the UK in pairs.
  • Name capital cities of the UK. 
  • name some of the key landmarks in London.
  • make a London landmark using a range of materials. 
  • explain what London is like using key words. 
  • describe and explain 3 key features about London using key words. 

off to the seaside- Foundation / Year 1

The UK and Surrounding Seas, weather patterns

In this summer term unit, the children talk about their holiday plans, they find out about how people holidayed in the past; they make links between holidays and the seasons. They explore the coast of Britain.

By the end of this unit children will have revisited concepts and knowledge over the year to secure their ability to:

  • Use keywords to describe different places and environments.
  • Talk about the different types of environments that people can visit and describe what they are like (town, village, city, countryside, seaside).
  • Use keywords to describe what seaside locations are like.
  • Use a map to find seaside locations.
  • Locate the nearest seaside resort on a map.
  • Use keywords to describe seaside locations and the key features of seaside locations
  • Say which features are ‘human’ and which are ‘physical’.
  • observe aerial photographs of seaside locations- spot key features of seaside locations using aerial photographs.
  • locate seaside resorts in the four countries of the UK.
  • explain that seaside resorts can be found in different countries in the UK.
  • Name some of these seaside resorts, using a webcam to explore what these places are like.
  • Describe what seaside holidays and resorts were like in the past and how they are today - explain some of the features of seaside holidays in the past and compare features of the seaside in the past and today.
  • Describe a seaside town in the UK and compare it with the local area
  • Describe places and routes on a map.

Hot and cold places- Foundation / Year 1

The poles, the equator, continents and oceans

This unit of work is studied across two terms. In the autumn term learners travel to the South Pole with Shackleton and compare the cold places on Earth with life on the equator. In the  spring term learners travel to the moon with Neil Armstrong looking at the earth from space.

By the end of this unit of work learners will be able to, with some support:

  • Name and locate the continents and oceans of the world  accurately. 
  • Use an atlas to locate the continents and oceans of the world.
  • Label a world map accurately. 
  • Name key features of the continents of the world. 
  • Research and explain  key facts about continents of the world.
  • Understand  and explain how a journey can be made around the world. 
  • Name some of the features that would be passed on a journey around the world.
  • Follow a journey line using key words such as continents, oceans and compass directions. 
  • Make a journey line using key words to describe the journey.
  • Understand the location of hot and cold countries around the world. 
  • Explain where hot and cold countries are located in the world. 
  • Begin to name climate zones around the world using key words (temperate, cold, warm, tropical).
  • Understand how the location of hot and cold countries affects the different animals that live there.
  • Locate Europe on a world map or globe and describe some of the key features. 
  • Name some countries in Europe and some key features
  • Find key features in aerial photographs (bridges, roads, coastline, forests, houses) using  observational skills.

In the garden- Foundation / Year 1 Weather

In this unit of work children will be growing plants, links will be made to conditions for growth and the seasons.

By the end of this unit learners will:

  • Understand what the weather is like in our country.
  • Name 4 types of weather that happen in the UK.
  • Understand how our weather changes throughout the year (seasons).
  • Observe the weather and make a record
  • Name the 4 seasons.
  • Describe some of the changes that take place in these seasons.
  • Describe how the weather can affect us - the clothes we wear, how we travel and the things we do.
  • Understand and describe what weather forecasts show.
  • Explain weather symbols
  • Understand the dangers of weather.
  • Understand some of the things that ‘extreme’ weather can do to our surroundings.
  • understand what hot and cold countries are like.
  • Explain how countries have different climates which can be hot or cold.
  • Name a hot country and a cold country and explain how they are different.
  • understand what a cold area of the world is like.
  • Locate (find) the Arctic on a world map or a globe.
  • Begin to locate other places such as the North Pole, South Pole and Antarctic.

Into the wild and into the past - Year 2

In this unit of work learners extend their knowledge off the local area and the United Kingdom.

In history learners study the local high street and how it has changed.

They will visit the market town of Ashby De la Zouch.

By the end of this unit they will have secured their ability to:

  • Undertake research and fieldwork to explore what Ashby de la Zouche is like
  • Use maps to locate places
  • Follow map to find places
  • Record as part of fieldwork
  • Describe like and dislikes about Ashby de la Zouche
  • Use geographical vocabulary to describe human features
  • Describe the different types of shops on the high street adn the jobs created by these shops
  • Ask questions
  • Talk about how humans can and have changed the local areas
  • Suggest improvements

London's Burning - magical maps- Year 2

In year 2 learners find out about The Great Fire of London. This provides and opportunity to secure the knowledge developed in class 1 about the capital city of England and the four countries of the UK. They use historical maps to explore the city and find out how it changed following the fire. In geography, they explore maps at different scales adn create their own maps.

By the end of this unit they will have secured their ability to:

  • Draw a simple sketch map of the local area
  • Name different types of map and at least 2 key features. 
  • Compare different types of map. 
  • Explain what a sketch map shows
  • Use compass directions to move around a map.
  • Say the four points of a compass.
  • Plan and describe a route in the local area using road, place names and a key.
  • Identify and name map symbols. 
  • Explain why map symbols are used. 
  • Use an atlas to find places in the UK. 
  • Use an index in an atlas to find countries and other places in the UK. 
  • Explain how to use an atlas. 
  • Locate the seven continents of the world using an atlas. 
  • Use an atlas to find places around the world. 
  • Locate the five major oceans of the world using an atlas. 
  • Explain the difference between seas and oceans. 
  • Begin to locate some of the world main seas. 
  • Explain what an aerial view is. 
  • Use  observational skills to find key features in aerial photographs. 
  • Compare an aerial view and a ground level view.
  • Use key words to explain human and physical features.

Travels with my bear : African safari - year 2

In this unit of work learners will build on their knowledge and understanding of the geography of the wider world from year 1 - hot and cold places - by studying the wilds of Africa. They compare the forests and woodland habitats of the UK studied in the autumn term with the national parks and reserves in Kenya.

By the end of this unit learners will be able to:

  • Explain where Kenya is in the world.
  • Use an atlas independently to locate Kenya on a world map.
  • Draw a simple map.
  • Draw a freehand map of Kenya and label it with main cities, oceans, rivers and mountains.
  • Understand what life is like for people living in Kenya.
  • Undertake research to find out more about Kenya and share their learning
  • Explain what a national park is and its features, making links with the national forest in the UK
  • Explain how a national park is different to a game reserve. 
  • Explain why people visit Kenya on holiday.
  • Use compass directions to describe places on a map.
  • Use N, E, S and W correctly to move around a map.
  • Create a new national park or reserve including the key features (key, compass, title, symbols, safari route).
  • Name 5 animals that live in Kenya and explain why they might migrate
  • Explain why animals are important to Kenya.
  • Explain what ‘endangered’ means and why animals in Kenya might be endangered.
  • Describe at least 3 things about the Maasai people and culture.
  • Identify some similarities and differences between the Maasai culture and our culture.
  • observe photographs and ask questions to find out about a place. 
  • I can observe photographs of Kenya and England and ask questions to find out more about Kenya or England.
  • Make comparisons between life in England and Kenya

the river Nile - year 3 and 4

In this unit of work learners will consider the importance of the river Nile to life in Ancient Egypt. They will find out about the building of the Aswan dam in History and its impact. In science, they study materials and states of matter.

Links are made to learning in key stage 1 ( Africa). Learning will support work in upper KS2 on the Amazon and Americas.

By the End of this unit learners will be able to:

  • Explain the three states of matter.
  • Describe water in its solid, liquid and gaseous state. 
  • Explain how to change a solid into a liquid; how to turn a liquid into a gas
  • Use the terms freezing, evaporation and condensation to describe how water changes.
  • Name the temperatures at which water freezes and boils.
  • Explain the key aspects of the water cycle. 
  • Explain where the processes of evaporation and condensation occur in the water cycle.
  • Explain that the water cycle keeps going.
  • Explain why the water cycle is a closed cycle.
  • Explain that changes in temperature cause evaporation and condensation.
  • Explain how clouds and rain are formed.
  • Use the words condensation and precipitation to explain why it rains.
  • Use the words evaporation and condensation to explain why clouds form.
  • Name some different types of clouds.
  • Explain how and why drinking water is cleaned.
  • Give a reason why water needs to be cleaned before drinking. 
  • Suggest ways to remove dirt from water. 
  • Explain some of the steps involved in cleaning water. 
  • Explain the causes and effects of flooding.
  • List different types of flooding.
  • Describe some of the ways flooding affects communities.
  • Describe ways to limit flood damage.
  • Understand the causes and effects of water pollution.
  • describe the effect of water pollution on drinking water.
  • describe some of the ways water pollution affects plants and animals.
  • list some ways to reduce water pollution.

All Around The world -  Year 3 AND 4

Making links to a study of the Ancient Mayans and Egyptians learners will I build on their knowledge of the world from KS1. 

By the end of this unit learners will:

  • Explain the position and significance of the Equator, the Northern Hemisphere, and the Southern Hemisphere.
  • Locate the Equator on a map and globe.
  • Locate the Northern Hemisphere on a map and globe.
  • Locate the Southern Hemisphere on a map and globe.
  • Explain the position and significance of the Equator, the Northern Hemisphere, and the Southern Hemisphere.
  • Locate the Equator on a map and globe.
  • Locate the Northern Hemisphere on a map and globe.
  • Locate the Southern Hemisphere on a map and globe.
  • Name some of the countries on the Equator.
  • Identify lines of latitude and longitude.
  • Identify lines of latitude on a map.
  • Use longitude and latitude to find places on maps, atlases and globes.
  • Identify a location on a map when the latitude and longitude are provided
  • Identify the latitude and longitude of a location on a map
  • Compare the climate of South America with the UK climate.
  • Identify the location of the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn
  • Identify differences between the UK and the tropics.
  • Describe the climate in the tropics.
  • Explain the position and significance of the Prime Meridian
  • Identify the location of the Prime Meridian.
  • Why one Prime Meridian was needed.
  • Why the Prime Meridian’s location was chosen.
  • Explain the position and significance of time zones.
  • Explain why day and night occur.
  • Explain why we need to have time zones.
  • Find the local time in another city using time differences
 
 

Somewhere TO SETTLE - YEAR 3 AND 4

This unit will make links to settlements studied in history. Learners will being to explore why people move.

By the end of this unit learners will be able:

  • Explain why settlements develop in certain locations.
  • Explain what a settlement is.
  • Identify important features of a settlement site.
  • Sort settlers' needs by importance.
  • Identify reasons settlers have chosen a site.
  • Explain why settlements develop in certain locations.
  • List the things settlers need from a settlement site.
  • Identify features of a good settlement site.
  • Give reasons why a settlement site might be unsuitable.
  • Use maps to identify settlements built by invaders.
  • Explain that settlements have been built at different times in history.
  • Explain some settlements were built by invaders.
  • Identify who built a settlement from clues in its name.
  • Identify patterns of historical settlements using maps.
  • Compare land use in different settlements.
  • List different types of land use.
  • Identify land use using a digital map.
  • Identify similarities and differences between land use in different places.
  • Use maps to identify links between settlements.
  • Use a key to identify transport links on maps.
  • Use an atlas to find a route between two places.
  • Describe directions of travel using the eight compass points.
  • Create a map of a settlement.
  • List important features of a settlement site.
  • Draw a map of a settlement.
  • Create a key for a map.

The UK AND EARLY SETTLEMENTS/ our CHANGING nation -  YEAR 3 AND 4

This unit of work develops learners understanding and knowledge of the UK and London. It builds on learning from KS1 and has links to work in History both in key stage 1 and 2. It links with and supports the study of The Romans in history.

By the end of this unit learners will be able to:

  • Name and locate the countries and cities of the UK.
  • Locate the countries that make up the UK on a map.
  • Name the capital cities of the countries of the UK.
  • Label key cities in the UK on a map.
  • Use the eight compass points to describe the location of the countries and cities of the UK.
  • Use the 8 compass points to describe a location on a map.
  • Use the 8 compass points to describe a location relative to another place.
  • Name and locate the main rivers and seas of the UK.
  • Name the seas surrounding the UK.
  • Name some of the UK’s main rivers.
  • Name the seas some rivers flow into.
  • Identify rivers and seas using an atlas or map.
  • Find the names of seas on a map.
  • Find the names of rivers on a map.
  • Follow a river on a map to find where it starts and ends.
  • Name and locate some of the counties of the UK.
  • Explain what a county is.
  • Name some counties local to my area.
  • Use a map to locate some of the counties of the UK.
  • Find my county on a map.
  • Identify some counties local to my area on a map.
  • Name and locate areas of high ground in the UK. 
  • Find areas of high ground on a map on the UK. 
  • Use a map or atlas to locate areas of high ground in the UK.
  • Find the height of a peak on a map.
  • Identify ways that London has changed over time.
  • Describe some ways that London has changed since AD43
  • Talk about early settlers in London
  • Explain why London has changed since AD43.
  • Explain the importance of the Prime Meridian to London’s history.
  • Find London on world and UK maps.
  • Identify the location of the Prime Meridian.  
  • Explain why London was chosen to be the location of the Prime Meridian.
  • Describe and understand how the UK has changed over time.
  • Explain some reasons a place may change.
  • Describe how the UK population has changed over time.
  • Identify where some immigrants to the UK came from.
  • Identify similarities and differences between my daily routine and that of a child from another historical period.

Extreme EARTH - YEAR 3 AND 4

This unit of work supports learning and Science: Rocks and Soils. It is supported by visit to The Magna Centre.

By the end of this unit learners will be able to:

  • Describe and understand key aspects of physical geography.
  • Describe what you find underground.
  • Recognise that there is rock under all surfaces.
  • List the layers that make up the Earth.
  • Create and label a cross-section of the Earth.
  • Compare the Earth's structure to a familiar object.
  • Explain how volcanoes are formed.
  • Explain how tectonic plates move.
  • Explain you how a volcano is formed.
  • Name some of the parts of a volcano.
  • Explain what happens when a volcano erupts.
  • Explain how volcanoes effect people's lives.
  • Explain where volcanoes are found.
  • Use extinct, dormant and active when describing volcanoes.
  • List the risks and benefits of living near to a volcano.
  • Explain what causes earthquakes and how they are measured.
  • Describe where earthquakes happen.
  • Explain why earthquakes happen.
  • Explain how to keep safe in an earthquake.
  • Compare the strength of earthquakes.
  • Explain what causes tsunamis and how they affect people.
  • Explain where tsunamis happen.
  • Explain what causes a tsunami.
  • Describe the damage caused by a tsunami.
  • Explain how to keep safe in a tsunami.
  • Explain what causes tornadoes and the effects they have.
  • Explain how tornadoes form.
  • Explain how scientists collect data about storms.
  • Explain how scientists compare tornadoes.
  • Explain where tornadoes happen.

Leicester - Global City of culture Year 3 and 4

In this unit of work learners will build their knowledge of the local area. In class 1 they studied the school and village, in class 2 a local market town. Now, they will find out more about our counties city: Leicester. As part of this unit of work they will visit Leicester and explore its cultural diversity. Links will be made to the unit studied earlier in the year: The UK and early settlements / our changing nation.

This unit supports learning in History : Roman Leicester, The Battle of Bosworth / The king in the Car Park.

By the end of this unit learners will be able to:

  • Identify Leicester and its major features.
  • Locate Leicester and my school on a map.
  • Identify physical features of  Leicester using a map.
  • Identify human features of Leicester using a map.
  • Identify similarities and differences in locations of  Leicester and my school.
  • Compare the physical geography of Leicester with that of my own area.
  • Describe the landscape of Leicester town centre.
  • Describe the landscape around Leicester
  • Describe some similarities and differences between the landscape near Leicester and where I live.
  • Compare land use in Leicester with that of my own area.
  • Name different types of land use.
  • Identify the way land is used from a digital map.
  • Use a key to record types of land use.
  • Identify similarities and differences between land use in Leicester and where I live.
  • Compare the human geography of Leicester with that of my own area. 
  • Explain the difference between human geography and physical geography.
  • Describe the human geography of Leicester making links to why people might have settled in Leicester.
  • Identify similarities and differences between the human geography of Leicester and where I live.
  • Create a travel guide for a trip to Leicester.
  • Compare the physical and human features of Leicester with those of the area I live in.
  • Identify similarities and differences between the physical geography of Leicester and that of where I live.
  • Identify similarities and differences between the human geography of Leicester and that of where I live.
  • Suggest how life is different for people living in Leicester and where I live.
  • Suggest how life is similar for people living in Leicester and where I live.

oUR CHANGING WORLD - year 5 AND 6

By the end of this unit of work learners will be able to:

  • Explain how erosion and weathering can change the landscape.
  • Explain what weathering and erosion mean.
  • Name different types of weathering.
  • Describe how different types of weathering change rocks.
  • Describe how erosion changes rocks.
  • Explain how coastal features are formed.
  • Name some features of a coastline.
  • Explain how some coastal features are formed.
  • Explain how erosion and deposition form coastal features. 
  • Identify coastal features of the UK.
  • Name some famous UK coastal features.
  • Identify the location of some famous UK coastal features.
  • Explain how water and weather can change coastlines.
  • Explain how erosion and deposition change the look of a coastline.
  • Describe how a coastline might have looked in the past.
  • Describe how a coastline might look in the future.
  • Explain how water and weather have changed the coastline of the UK over time.
  • Name an area of the UK which has been affected by coastal erosion. 
  • Explain ow the shape of Spurn Head has changed over time.
  • Explain how the make-up of the United Kingdom has changed over time.
  • Identify how the UK’s borders have changed over time.
  • Identify how the borders of Europe have changed over time.
  • Explain how the international borders of Europe have changed over time.
  • Give reasons why the borders of Europe have changed.
  • Explain how and why landscapes change over time.
  • Explain how and why landscapes change over time.
  • Identify similarities in photographs of a landscape taken at different times.
  • Identify ways a landscape has changed over time.
  • Give reasons why a landscape might have changed over time.
  • Predict how physical factors might change the landscape in the future.
  • Describe how physical changes have affected Earth since 1800.
  • Describe some physical changes to the Earth predicted to occur by 2050.
  • Predict how physical factors might change the landscape in the future.
  • Describe how human activity has changed the Earth since 1800.
  • Describe some human activity changes to the Earth predicted to occur by 2050.

tHE AMAZING AMERICAS- year 5 AND 6

This unit of work builds on the geography of the Americas studied in year 3 and 4 when learners study the Ancient Mayans

By the end of this unit of work learners will be able to:

  • Identify the countries of North and South America.
  • Explain that a continent is a large landmass usually made up of a number of countries.
  • Identify some countries in North and South America.
  • Identify the capital city of a country.
  • Use an atlas to find the names of countries and cities.
  • Use geographical terminology to describe the location and characteristics of a range of places across the Americas.
  • Explain the meaning of key vocabulary relating to geographical location.
  • Explain how latitude affects the physical features of a geographical region. 
  • Use maps and atlases to locate countries and regions of the Americas.
  • Describe the geographical location and key characteristics of different places across the Americas.
  • Describe the climates and biomes of different regions across the Americas.
  • Describe how latitude influences the climate of an area.
  • Explain the difference between climate and weather.
  • Describe the climate, biome and likely weather conditions of an area of the Americas.
  • Identify other areas around the world with similar climates.
  • Compare the climate of a region of the Americas with where I live.
  • Identify physical and human geographical features of my local area.
  • Explain the difference between human geography and physical geography.
  • Plan and undertake fieldwork in my local area.
  • Present learning in creative ways.
  • Identify similarities and differences in the human and physical geography of my local area and a region of North America.
  • Identify similarities and differences between the human and physical geography of Death Valley, California and where I live.
  • Name and locate  the ancient and new wonders of the world.
  • Use an atlas to locate the wonders of the world.
  • Create a map and key showing the ancient and new wonders of the world.
  • Read and write coordinates. 
  • Describe the characteristics and significance of a natural wonder of the Americas.
  • Describe a natural wonder of the Americas in detail.

 

 

Raging RIVERS - year 5 AND 6

This unit of work build's on learns knowledge of rivers developed in study of Ancient Egypt and the Nile. The water Cycle which was studies in Year 3 and 4 within the science curriculum is revisited to secure knowledge.

By the end of this unit of work learners will be able to:

  • Explain the water cycle.
  • Explain that the water cycle keeps going.
  • Explain why the water cycle is a closed cycle.
  • Locate the key rivers of the UK.
  • Use the index in an atlas to find rivers on a map.
  • Use a legend to find rivers on a map.
  • Identify the place in which the source of a river is found.
  • Identify the sea a river flows into.
  • Identify key locations along a river.
  • Locate the key rivers of the world.
  • Use the index of an atlas to find rivers.
  • Compare the length of rivers.
  • Compare the discharge of rivers.
  • Describe the key features of a river system.
  • Describe some of the features of a river's upper course.
  • Describe some of the features of a river's middle course.
  • Describe some features of a river's lower course.
  • Describe the key features of a river system.
  • Describe how water erodes a riverbank.
  • Describe how deposition changes the shape of a river.
  • Describe how meanders form.
  • Describe how oxbow lakes form.
  • Describe how waterfalls are formed.
  • Use atlases and maps to identify the key features of a river system.
  • Identify meanders on a map and photograph.
  • Identify oxbow lakes on a map and photograph.
  • Explain the ways rivers can be used.
  • List some ways that rivers are used.
  • Sort the ways rivers are used in categories.
  • List some advantages for different uses of a river.
  • List some disadvantages for different uses of a river.
  • Identify possible future impacts of river use.
  • Explain the impact of damming rivers.
  • Explain  what a dam is.
  • Give at least two reasons why dams are built.
  • Give the location of one major dam.
  • Identify the advantages and benefits of building a dam.
  • Identify the disadvantages and risks of building a dam.

Marvellous maps - year 5 AND 6

By the end of this unit of work learners will be able to:

  • Find countries in Europe and North and South America on a map. 
  • Look up the co-ordinates of a location. 
  • Find a location on a page by using simple co-ordinates. 
  • Find cities in the UK on a map and identify some of their features. 
  • Identify physical features on a map.
  • Use a key to identify physical features.
  • Find information in an atlas using the index and simple co-ordinates. 
  • Use an index to find a place name.
  • Find the correct page in an atlas by using the index. 
  • Use a key to describe features on an Ordnance Survey map.
  • Explain why maps have symbols on them.
  • Use a key to find out what a symbol means.
  • Explain what makes a good map symbol.
  • Recognise some map symbols on an Ordnance Survey map.
  • Use the eight compass points to describe routes on a map.
  • Name the eight compass points.
  • Follow directions using the eight compass points.
  • Give directions using the eight compass points.
  • Use four and six figure grid references to locate places on a map.
  • Explain how to give co-ordinates by going along and then up.
  • find a location from four or six figure co-ordinates.
  • Plan a journey using the eight compass points and four or six figure grid references.
  • Give directions using the eight compass points.
  • Give four or six figure coordinates for a location.
  • Describe how land use has changed over time.
  • Find similarities and differences between photographs of the same location.
  • Find similarities and differences between maps of the same location.
  • Suggest what the differences I have seen might tell me about why a place has changed.

magnificent Mountains

By the end of this unit of work learners will be able:

  • use a map to find countries and their key features.
  • Use a legend to find areas of higher ground on a map.
  • Identify the country a mountain range is found in.
  • Locate key mountain ranges of the world.
  • Use the index in an atlas to find mountains.
  • Find the height of a peak on a map.
  • Locate key areas of higher ground in the UK.
  • Use a legend to find areas of higher ground on a map.
  • Identify the country an area of higher ground is found in.
  • Use a map to find and describe key features of the mountains.
  • Use the index in an atlas to find mountains.
  • Find the height of a peak on a map.
  • Identify different ways areas of higher ground are shown on a map.
  • Identify what a hill might look like based on its contours.
  • Draw contour lines to show higher ground.
  • Describe the key features of a mountain range.
  • Explain that not all mountains look the same.
  • Identify a valley and the summit, foot and slope of a mountain.
  • Identify an outcrop, a ridge, the tree line and the snow line.
  • Identify a plateau.
  • Draw a mountain range including the key features I have identified.
  • Explain how different types of mountains are formed.
  • Explain that mountains formed a very long time ago.
  • Describe how tectonic plates move together to create fold mountains.
  • Describe how lava flow creates volcanic mountains.
  • Describe how fault lines in the Earth’s crust move to create mountains.
  • Describe how pressure from magma under the Earth’s surface creates dome mountains.
  • Describe how erosion creates plateau mountains.
  • Describe a mountainous climate.
  • Describe what the weather is usually like on a mountain.
  • Explain the differences between a weather forecast and climate.
  • Compare mountain climates.
  • List the risks associated with a mountain climate.
  • Describe how tourism affects mountain regions.
  • Explain why people might visit mountains.
  • Describe some of the effects of tourism on an area.
  • Identify ways to limit the damage tourism causes to an area.
  • Identify who is responsible for limiting the damage tourism can cause.

Enough FOR EVERYONE (TRADE AND ECONOMICS) - yEAR 5 AND 6

This unit of work builds on learning from History (ancient civilisations) and work in geography in year 3 and 4. Units have been carefully selected to build knowledge over time.

By the end of this unit of work learners will be able to:

  • Explain what settlers need.
  • Identify important features of a settlement site.
  • List the resources a settlement needs to thrive.
  • Rank human needs by importance
  • Describe how human needs have changed over time.
  • Explain how electricity is generated and distributed.
  • Explain the main stages of electricity distribution.
  • Name some of the methods of power generation used in the UK.
  • Explain where electricity is generated in the UK.
  • Use an atlas to locate a given place.
  • Find a place on a blank map by comparing it to an atlas.
  • Label a map using a key.
  • Explain renewable sources of electricity.
  • Identify what makes an energy source renewable.
  • Name some of the renewable methods of power generation used in the UK.
  • Explain some renewable methods of power generation.
  • Describe the impact renewable sources have on UK electricity production.
  • Explain where our food comes from.
  • Find the country or town of origin on a food label.
  • List some foods that are produced in the UK.
  • Explain why foods are imported and exported.
  • Identify some benefits of importing food.
  • Identify some issues related to importing food.
  • Explain where electricity is generated in the UK.
  • Explain what food miles are.
  • Use digital maps to calculate the distance between two places.
  • Explain the importance of conserving food, water and energy supplies.
  • explain the terms efficiency and conservation.
  • Identify ways to reduce food wastage.
  • Identify ways to reduce water wastage.
  • Identify ways to reduce energy usage.
  • Identify ways to reduce my carbon footprint.
  • Explain that access to natural resources varies in different countries.
  • Explain why food shortages are a global problem.
  • Name areas of the world most affected by food shortages.
  • Explain how CO2 levels impact global access to resources.
  • Describe causes of food shortages in a foreign country.
  • Reflect on my own role in reducing resource shortages around the world.